Hunting and Collecting

For thousands of years, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have used the natural environment and its resources for both cultural and economic purposes in a sustainable way.

The colonisation of Australia brought about rapid changes to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and has dramatically affected the land and the way people live. 

Today Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people have a right to continue their cultural practices within their own sea countries in the Marine Park.  This includes traditional use of marine resources through activities such as collecting, hunting and fishing.  

There are many threats to marine animals and marine resources such as coastal development, habitat degradation, boat strikes, netting, sedimentation and pollution and these threats need to be addressed collectively. 

An important objective for Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people reef-wide, and for the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), is to ensure that the traditional use of any marine resources occurs at sustainable levels.


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