Ripples of environmental change for Cooktown State School

Published: 08/04/2014

Cooktown State School received a boost to help their students make positive environmental changes in their community and for the Great Barrier Reef.

The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) presented the school with a $500 Ripples of Change funding grant, as part of the agency’s annual Reef Guardian School awards.

GBRMPA Reef Guardian schools acting program manager Carolyn Luder said the Ripples of Change grants helped Reef Guardian Schools kick-start sustainability projects.

“Cooktown State School will use the funding to help build a chook pen so they can compost food scraps through feeding the chickens,” she said.

“Reef Guardian School students are future custodians of the Great Barrier Reef and it’s important to encourage them to care for their local environment and promote real change in their communities.”

Cooktown State School teacher Alice Taylor said the students were excited to receive the grant.

“Here in Cooktown we are very close to the Great Barrier Reef — we must empower our students to make responsible decisions about how they live and make sure they are looking after the earth now and into the future,” Ms Taylor said.

“We’re also aiming to create a permaculture garden in 2014 so students can utilise an outdoor learning space that provides hands-on experiences for them whilst promoting environmental sustainability.”

Each year 20 Reef Guardian Schools receive a Ripples of Change grant to support expanding existing sustainability projects or implementing new Reef Guardian projects within the school or community.

This year, Reef Guardian Schools received Ripples of Change grants for building sensory gardens, composting, and reducing water use.

More than 300 schools and over 123,000 students take part in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority’s Reef Guardian Schools program across Queensland.

Through this environmental education program, each school undertakes a variety of activities aimed at improving the Reef’s health and resilience.

 Students and teachers at Cooktown State School were excited to receive the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Ripples of Change grant from Andrew Denzin. They will use the $500 funding to build a chook pen and collecting food scraps that can be composted by the chickens.

Above: Students and teachers at Cooktown State School were excited to receive the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Ripples of Change grant from Andrew Denzin. They will use the $500 funding to build a chook pen and collecting food scraps that can be composted by the chickens.

 


Name: GBRMPA Media
Contact: (07) 4750 0846